Here's What's New With The Upcoming iOS 11.2

The fifth version of the forthcoming iOS 11.2 update is now available for iPhones enrolled in Apple’s Beta Software Program – and it brings a number of neat new features to the table, including AirPlay 2.

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The most notable addition is Apple Pay Cash, the firm’s iMessage-based peer-to-peer payment system, which is expected to rival the likes of PayPal, Skrill and Venmo when it (eventually) launches worldwide.

iOS 11.2 also increases the wireless charging limit on the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and flagship iPhone X from 5 to 7.5 watts, yielding a marginally faster charging speed – but it’s still nothing to write home about.

It’s thought that the bulk of the changes included in the release have been designed to improve the performance of the operating system – and that’s reflected in a Geekbench test the folks over at iDownloadBlog ran.

An iPhone X with the fifth preview build of iOS 11.2 installed scored 4,157 in the single-core and 10,088 in the multi-core test, while an identical unit running the previous build clocked in at 3,954 and 8,432, respectively.

Here’s the official changelog:

  • Apple Pay Cash – a quick peer-to-peer payments system that works through the iMessage app
  • Faster wireless charging for the iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and iPhone X (7.5W)
  • Early AirPlay 2 support
  • New Control Center indicator on iPhone X
  • Tweaked emoji
  • iPhone 8 and iPhone X marketing wallpapers available on older phones
  • New iPhone X Live wallpapers
  • “Now Playing” option for controlling content on the Apple TV in Control Center
  • Control Center info cards for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth toggles
  • Bug fix for Calculator app
  • A feature that lets developers add introductory pricing for subscription apps

We don’t know when Apple is planning to start rolling out the final version of iOS 11.2, but it’s safe to say it will have completed its rollout by the time Christmas Day comes around. Nothing’s set in stone, though.

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Building a healthy app for mHealth

Building a healthy app for mHealth

Building a healthy app for mHealth.

(a tutorial, of sorts)

Mobile technology and health care are coming together to create amazing new products, services and solutions. Some are saving lives. Some are creating efficiencies. All are changing the face of health care today.

But for all the innovation coming to market, there’s still more to be done. Across universities, hospitals, board rooms and marketing departments – there are ideas that could push mHealth forward – but for a wide variety reasons – they haven’t found their way from the back of a napkin to the App Store.

As someone who’s overseen the design and development of hundreds of mobile applications, I know first hand why many apps never get started: it’s daunting.

Apps can be incredibly easy to use – but the thought of creating one from scratch can be very intimidating.

Where do you even begin?

A PEEK INTO THE DISTANT, AND NOT SO DISTANT, FUTURE

A PEEK INTO THE DISTANT, AND NOT SO DISTANT, FUTURE

Mobile World Congress 2017 - San Francisco 

For years I’ve heard the stories of MWC Barcelona. The connections forged. The names dropped. The nightlife enjoyed. But as the President of MEDL Mobile, a mid-sized mobile development shop in Southern California, I’ve personally never felt the need to attend. A week abroad is an expensive trip for many reasons - both in terms of time away from the business and in terms of international flights. So when it was announced that MWC would be held in San Francisco this year, I jumped at the chance to attend.

React Native Radio Episode 73

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A few weeks ago our VP of Production, Michael Gilmore, was the special guest for React Native Radio’s episode 73. Gilmore discusses everything from his life back in Mississippi, to programming in React Native. We’ve included a full episode guide along with ways to connect with the panel. Enjoy!

"React Native Radio is a weekly discussion of the tools, techniques, and technologies used to build mobile applications with JavaScript and React done by developers regularly using React Native."

Episode 73 guide

Introduction - 1:34

Moving from Mississippi to California - 8:30

Working at MEDL Mobile - 12:05

How React Native fits in at MEDL Mobile - 14:35

What MEDL Mobile used before React Native - 24:00

App solutions outside of React Native - 28:47

MEDL Mobile’s developers - 32:00

When React Native isn’t the best solution -  38:45

When to use React Native - 47:00

Follow The Panel

Michael Gilmore - Twitter | Instagram 

React Native Radio - Twitter

Nader Dabit  - Twitter

Kevin Old - Twitter

 

 

Build React Native Apps: Demo by MEDL Mobile

Just last month Wowza and MEDL Mobile performed a live coding demonstration at NAB.  We’re really pleased with the community response and having a partner like Wowza to develop such tools as their GoCoder SDK!  Check out their recap here:

Interested in learning more about mobile video and live streaming apps?  Contact us or Click here.

Why ASO Matters

Why ASO Matters

Apple and Google continue to gain new users daily, and mobile app developers are taking advantage of the influx of users. App stores mainly operate off user searches, making app stores the largest channel of discovering mobile apps, installs and downloads. The best way for measuring and adjusting and app listing is called App Store Optimization, and it provides key considerations for optimizing any mobile app.

Canvas Vision - A Colorful Experiment

Canvas Vision - A Colorful Experiment

Our vision for Canvas Vision

For the recent OC Addy's, MEDL was given a blank canvas as part of a charity auction. Various agencies would all get creative and make something cool.  With our canvas, we produced an experimental art piece that tried to solve a basic problem.  Some people can't paint but want to make art.  After a bit of kicking ideas around, we landed on the idea that anyone can take a photo, and that just might be enough.  From there we looked at utilizing image recognition services and found that we could do a ton with color detection.